The king of ready-to-wear men’s clothing, Mariusz Przybylski specialises in combining tailored classics with contemporary geometric shapes

Genius of Geometry

 Mariusz Przybylski’s Ultra collection, s/s 12, model: Greg Nawrat. Photo: Daniel Duniak & Grzegorz Korzeniowski, courtesy of Mariusz Przybylski

Mariusz Przybylski’s Ultra collection, s/s 12, model: Greg Nawrat. Photo: Daniel Duniak & Grzegorz Korzeniowski, courtesy of Mariusz Przybylski

“Te idea of creating the line Philosophy by Mariusz Przybylski was simple and obvious. When I was a young boy I had nothing to wear. I reamed that I would dress the street, that I would create afordable, accessible clothes that could be combined with something from a second hand shop or a clothing chain”, says Mariusz Przybylski.

Like many Polish fashion designers, Mariusz Przybylski took his frst steps in the industry by designing tailored clothes. Born in 1979, Przybylski remembers the 1990s in Poland, when many old fashion houses shut down, and the market was fooded with low-cost clothing, popular brands, fakes and bazaar trash. Perhaps it is the trauma of the 90s that encouraged those creators who launched their careers in the noughties to design luxury clothes, made for the red carpet. Only over the last few years, afer the saturation of demand for luxury projects, do we see an increase in production of afordable, original ‘ready to wear’ collections.

Te changes could also be a byproduct of Poland’s economic development. Since the fall of a huge clothing and textile industry, strong in the communist era, private entrepreneurs have created small but competitive, professional sewing factories, working not only with Polish designers — international fashion houses such as Acne and Isabel Marant work with the same factories as Mariusz Przybylski. Production in Poland allows easy and constant quality control of clothes and working conditions of workers employed in sewing rooms. It also contributes to the prevention of full de-industrialisation of Europe and the development of regions with a high unemployment rate.

 Mariusz Przybylski AW17/18, courtesy of Mariusz Przybylski 

Mariusz Przybylski AW17/18, courtesy of Mariusz Przybylski 


Te king of ready-to-wear men’s clothing, Mariusz Przybylski specialises in combining tailored classics with contemporary geometric shapes and distinctive prints. Przybylski cleverly juxtaposes modernistic severity with more expressive elements, such as acute angles and aggressive slashes, and his sculpted and architectural outlines are reminiscent of art deco tower blocks.

Przybylski’s impressive prints have already become the stuf of Polish fashion legend. Examples include his tree rings motif s/s 12, foral meadows f/w 14, and angular prints s/s 15 that resemble digitalised and geometricised versions of Egyptian paterns.

Mariusz Przybylski AW17/18, courtesy of Mariusz Przybylski
Przybylski, who studied textiles and fashion at the Academy of Fine Arts in Łódź, held his frst fashion show—a menswear collection—in 2005 and four years later began designing for women. 

Przybylski’s collections have been shown during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in Berlin. Meanwhile, television audiences across Poland will also recognise Przybylski from the Polish version of Project Runway, in which he featured as one of the judges.

 

Paulina Latham